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How To Add Multiple Values to GRUB_CMDLINE_DEFAULT in Ubuntu

Ubuntu 16

When working with Ubuntu, you may find yourself needing to modify the GRUB bootloader’s default command line. This can be achieved by adding multiple values to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT variable. This article will guide you through the process in a detailed and comprehensive manner.

Quick Answer

To add multiple values to GRUB_CMDLINE_DEFAULT in Ubuntu, you can edit the /etc/default/grub file using a text editor in the terminal. Add the desired values within the quotes of the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT variable, separated by spaces. Save the file and update GRUB using the sudo update-grub command.

Understanding GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT

Before we dive into the process, it’s important to understand what GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT is. This variable is found in the /etc/default/grub file and is used to set the default kernel parameters. The values you add to this variable are passed to the kernel at boot time.

Accessing the GRUB Configuration File

To add values to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT, you first need to access the GRUB configuration file. This can be done using a text editor in the terminal. For example, you can use the nano editor by typing:

sudo nano /etc/default/grub

This command opens the GRUB configuration file in the nano text editor. The sudo command is used to run the command as the root user, which is necessary because the GRUB configuration file is a system file.

Adding Multiple Values to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT

Once you have the GRUB configuration file open, you can add multiple values to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT. The values should be added within the quotes and separated by spaces. For example:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash net.ifnames=0"

In this example, we have three parameters: quiet, splash, and net.ifnames=0.

  • quiet disables most log messages.
  • splash enables the splash screen.
  • net.ifnames=0 disables the predictable network interface names, causing the system to revert to the old ethX naming scheme.

Saving and Updating GRUB

After adding the desired values, save the file and exit the text editor. If you’re using nano, you can do this by pressing Ctrl+X, then Y to confirm that you want to save the changes, and then Enter to confirm the file name.

Finally, you need to update GRUB for the changes to take effect. This can be done by running the following command:

sudo update-grub

This command generates a new GRUB configuration based on the default settings and the changes you made to the /etc/default/grub file.

Conclusion

That’s it! You have successfully added multiple values to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT in Ubuntu. Remember to be careful when modifying system files and always double-check your changes before saving the file. If you have any questions or run into any issues, don’t hesitate to consult the Ubuntu documentation or ask for help on the Ubuntu forums.

Can I add multiple values to `GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT` in Ubuntu?

Yes, you can add multiple values to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT in Ubuntu. Simply add the values within the quotes and separate them with spaces.

What is the purpose of the `GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT` variable?

The GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT variable is used to set the default kernel parameters in the GRUB bootloader. The values you add to this variable are passed to the kernel at boot time.

How do I access the GRUB configuration file?

To access the GRUB configuration file, you can use a text editor in the terminal. For example, you can use the command sudo nano /etc/default/grub to open the file in the nano text editor.

How do I save and update GRUB after modifying the configuration file?

After making changes to the GRUB configuration file, you can save the file by pressing Ctrl+X, then Y to confirm the changes, and then Enter to confirm the file name if you’re using nano. To update GRUB and apply the changes, run the command sudo update-grub.

What are some examples of values that can be added to `GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT`?

Some examples of values that can be added to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT include quiet, which disables most log messages, splash, which enables the splash screen, and net.ifnames=0, which disables predictable network interface names. These values are separated by spaces within the quotes.

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