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How To Add /snap/bin to PATH Used by Systemd

Ubuntu 12

In this article, we will walk you through the process of adding /snap/bin to the PATH used by systemd. This is particularly useful when you want to ensure that the systemd service can access the binaries installed via Snap.

Quick Answer

To add /snap/bin to the PATH used by systemd, you can either temporarily add it using the export command in the terminal or permanently add it by editing the /etc/environment file. The temporary addition is lost when the terminal is closed, while the permanent addition affects all users on the system.

What is /snap/bin?

Snap is a software deployment and package management system developed by Canonical for operating systems that use the Linux kernel. The applications installed via Snap are stored in the /snap/bin directory. To use these applications from the command line, the /snap/bin directory needs to be included in the system’s PATH.

What is PATH?

PATH is an environmental variable in Linux and other Unix-like operating systems that tells the shell which directories to search for executable files in response to commands issued by a user.

What is systemd?

systemd is a system and service manager for Linux operating systems. It is designed to be backward compatible with SysV init scripts, and provides a number of features such as parallel startup of system services at boot time, on-demand activation of daemons, or dependency-based service control logic.

Adding /snap/bin to the PATH

There are two methods to add /snap/bin to the PATH used by systemd:

Method 1: Temporary Addition

  1. Open a terminal and check the current value of the PATH variable by running the command:
echo $PATH

This command will print the current PATH setting to the terminal.

  1. If /snap/bin is not already included in the PATH, you can add it temporarily by running the command:
export PATH="$PATH:/snap/bin"

The export command sets the PATH variable to its current value plus :/snap/bin. This addition is temporary and will be lost when the terminal is closed.

  1. Verify that /snap/bin has been added to the PATH by running echo $PATH again.
  2. Restart the systemd service that uses the docker command. This will ensure that the updated PATH is used by systemd.

Method 2: Permanent Addition

  1. Open a terminal and edit the /etc/environment file using a text editor with root privileges. For example:
sudo nano /etc/environment

The sudo command is used to execute the command with root privileges. nano is a simple, user-friendly text editor.

  1. Add /snap/bin to the end of the line that starts with PATH=. Separate it from the existing paths with a colon (:). The line should look something like this:
PATH="/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/snap/bin"
  1. Save the changes and exit the text editor.
  2. Restart the systemd service that uses the docker command to apply the updated PATH.

Note that modifying the /etc/environment file will affect all users on the system, so be cautious when making changes.

Conclusion

Adding /snap/bin to the PATH used by systemd can be a useful way to ensure that your systemd services can access the binaries installed via Snap. However, it’s important to understand the implications of modifying the PATH and to test any changes thoroughly. If you’re unsure, consider seeking advice from a knowledgeable colleague or a trusted online community.

Why is it necessary to add /snap/bin to the PATH used by systemd?

Adding /snap/bin to the PATH used by systemd is necessary to ensure that the systemd service can access the binaries installed via Snap. Without adding it, the service may not be able to locate and execute the Snap applications.

How can I check the current value of the PATH variable?

You can check the current value of the PATH variable by opening a terminal and running the command echo $PATH. This will print the current PATH setting to the terminal.

What is the difference between temporary and permanent addition of /snap/bin to the PATH?

Temporary addition of /snap/bin to the PATH is done using the export command in the terminal. This addition is lost when the terminal is closed. Permanent addition, on the other hand, involves editing the /etc/environment file, which affects all users on the system and persists even after rebooting the system.

How can I edit the /etc/environment file with root privileges?

You can edit the /etc/environment file with root privileges by opening a terminal and using a text editor with root access, such as sudo nano /etc/environment. The sudo command is used to execute the command with root privileges, and nano is an example of a text editor that can be used.

What precautions should I take when modifying the /etc/environment file?

When modifying the /etc/environment file, it’s important to exercise caution as it affects all users on the system. Make sure to double-check the changes before saving the file. It’s also a good practice to create a backup of the original file before making any modifications.

How can I restart a systemd service?

You can restart a systemd service by using the systemctl restart [service-name] command. For example, to restart a service named "docker", you would run systemctl restart docker.

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