Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

Using Your Android Phone as a Microphone on Ubuntu: Alternatives to WO Mic

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In today’s digital age, our smartphones have become versatile tools capable of performing a variety of tasks. One such use is turning your Android phone into a microphone for your Ubuntu system. While WO Mic is a popular choice for this, it’s not officially supported on Linux. However, there are several alternatives available. In this article, we will explore some of these options in detail.

Quick Answer

Using your Android phone as a microphone on Ubuntu is possible with alternatives to WO Mic. Some options include using Mumble, Murmur, and Plumble for voice chat, setting up WO Mic on Linux using the micclient-ubuntu-x86 tool, using an IP camera app with PulseAudio, connecting your phone to your desktop’s microphone jack with an aux cable and using a microphone app, or using the "broo" script for Pipewire users.

Mumble + Murmur + Plumble

Mumble is an open-source, low-latency, high-quality voice chat software primarily intended for use while gaming. Murmur is the server side of the Mumble client-server architecture. Plumble is a Mumble client for Android and iOS.

To use this setup, you’ll need to install Mumble on your Ubuntu system, set up Murmur as a LAN server, and install Plumble on your Android phone. The setup process involves configuring the programs for best quality and minimal latency. For detailed instructions on how to set up Mumble, Murmur, and Plumble on your Ubuntu system, please refer to the official Mumble documentation.

WO Mic on Linux

Although WO Mic is not officially supported on Linux, you can make it work using the micclient-ubuntu-x86 command-line tool provided by WO Mic. This method involves loading the ALSA snd-aloop module, connecting to the phone via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, and redirecting the audio to the loopback device.

Here’s a basic example of how to load the ALSA module:

sudo modprobe snd-aloop

In this command, modprobe is used to add a module to the Linux Kernel, and snd-aloop is the name of the sound loopback module.

For detailed instructions on how to set up WO Mic on Linux, please refer to this guide.

IP Camera + PulseAudio

Another alternative is to use an IP camera app on your phone, such as IP Camera, and PulseAudio on your Ubuntu system.

After setting up the IP camera server on your phone and connecting your PC to the same network, you can access the IP camera’s audio stream in a web browser. Then, using PulseAudio, you can redirect the audio from the browser to your microphone channel.

Aux Cable + Microphone App

If your phone has an audio jack, you can connect it to your desktop’s microphone jack using an aux cable. Then, install a microphone app on your phone that redirects the microphone input to the speaker, such as Microphone. This setup allows you to use your phone as a virtual microphone, and the audio will be captured by your desktop’s microphone input.

Broo

For those using Pipewire instead of PulseAudio, you can try using the “broo” script, which is a Pipewire-compatible version of the Mumble script mentioned earlier. This script sets up the server and handles the audio redirection. You can find the script and instructions in this GitHub repository.

In conclusion, while WO Mic is a popular choice for using your Android phone as a microphone on your Ubuntu system, it’s not the only option. With the alternatives discussed in this article, you can find a solution that best suits your needs. Remember to follow the provided instructions and documentation for each solution to ensure proper setup and functionality.

Is WO Mic compatible with Ubuntu?

WO Mic is not officially supported on Linux, including Ubuntu. However, there are alternative methods available to use your Android phone as a microphone on Ubuntu, as mentioned in the article.

Can I use my iPhone as a microphone on Ubuntu?

The methods discussed in this article primarily focus on using an Android phone as a microphone on Ubuntu. However, you can explore alternative options or apps available for iOS devices that provide similar functionality.

Are there any other voice chat software options besides Mumble?

While Mumble is a popular choice, there are other voice chat software options available for Ubuntu, such as Discord, TeamSpeak, and Zoom. These platforms may have their own methods or apps to use your phone as a microphone, so it’s worth exploring their documentation and support resources.

Do I need to root my Android phone to use it as a microphone on Ubuntu?

No, rooting your Android phone is not necessary to use it as a microphone on Ubuntu. The methods mentioned in this article do not require root access. However, some apps or methods may have additional features or functionality that require root access, but they are not essential for basic microphone usage.

Can I use a USB cable instead of Wi-Fi or Bluetooth for connecting my Android phone to Ubuntu?

The methods discussed in this article primarily rely on Wi-Fi or Bluetooth for connecting your Android phone to Ubuntu. While it may be possible to use a USB cable for this purpose, the setup and configuration may differ from the methods described here. It’s recommended to explore specific documentation or resources related to using a USB connection for microphone functionality.

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