Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

What Generates Empty XXXXX.html.part Files on Kubuntu 22.04 Desktop?

Ubuntu 14

The appearance of empty XXXXX.html.part files on your Kubuntu 22.04 desktop can be puzzling. These files, often seen as temporary files, can clutter your workspace and leave you wondering about their origin. This article aims to shed light on what generates these files, why they appear, and how to manage them.

Quick Answer

Thunderbird, the email client on Kubuntu 22.04, is the likely source of the empty XXXXX.html.part files on your desktop. These files are temporary files created when you open email attachments in Thunderbird. Although they should be automatically removed, a known issue causes them to remain on the desktop. You can use tools like opensnoop-bpfcc to confirm the origin of these files and safely delete them. Changing Thunderbird’s settings to save attachments in a designated folder can also help manage these files better.

Understanding XXXXX.html.part Files

The XXXXX.html.part files are typically temporary files created by certain applications during their operation. The .part extension indicates a partially downloaded file, often seen when a download is in progress or has been interrupted. However, these files appearing on your desktop and remaining empty is not a usual occurrence.

In the case of Kubuntu 22.04, the most likely culprit behind these files is the Thunderbird email client. When you compose an email, attach a file, and then open the attached file, Thunderbird creates these temporary files. They are supposed to be removed automatically, but due to a known issue, they remain on the desktop.

Investigating the Origin of the Files

To confirm the source of these files, you can use tools that monitor file activity on your system. Tools like opensnoop-bpfcc, fatrace, or auditctl can be used to identify the process responsible for creating the files.

For instance, opensnoop-bpfcc is a tool that traces open() syscalls to see which processes are opening which files. To use it, open a terminal and type:

sudo opensnoop-bpfcc

This command will start monitoring all file activity on your system. If you open an email attachment in Thunderbird while this command is running, you should see Thunderbird listed as the process that opened the XXXXX.html.part file.

Managing the XXXXX.html.part Files

These files are harmless and can be safely deleted. However, constantly having to manually remove them can be inconvenient. A workaround is to change the folder where Thunderbird saves these temporary files.

To do this, open Thunderbird, go to Edit > Preferences > Attachments and change the ‘Save files to’ option to a directory of your choice. This way, even if Thunderbird continues to generate these files, they will be saved in a designated folder, keeping your desktop clean.

Conclusion

The mysterious XXXXX.html.part files on your Kubuntu 22.04 desktop are most likely generated by Thunderbird during the process of opening email attachments. While these files can be safely deleted, changing Thunderbird’s settings can help manage them better. Tools like opensnoop-bpfcc can be used to monitor file activity and confirm the origin of these files.

Remember, understanding your system’s behavior is key to maintaining a clean and efficient workspace. Stay curious, and don’t hesitate to investigate unusual occurrences on your system.

What are XXXXX.html.part files?

XXXXX.html.part files are temporary files typically created by applications during their operation. The .part extension indicates a partially downloaded file.

Why do XXXXX.html.part files appear on my Kubuntu 22.04 desktop?

The most likely cause of XXXXX.html.part files appearing on your Kubuntu 22.04 desktop is the Thunderbird email client. When you open an attached file in Thunderbird, it creates these temporary files. Due to a known issue, they may remain on the desktop instead of being removed automatically.

Can I delete the XXXXX.html.part files?

Yes, the XXXXX.html.part files are harmless and can be safely deleted. However, you may need to delete them manually unless you change Thunderbird’s settings to save them in a different folder.

How can I confirm if Thunderbird is generating the XXXXX.html.part files?

You can use tools like opensnoop-bpfcc, fatrace, or auditctl to monitor file activity on your system. Running opensnoop-bpfcc in the terminal while opening an email attachment in Thunderbird should show Thunderbird as the process responsible for creating the XXXXX.html.part file.

How can I change Thunderbird’s settings to manage the XXXXX.html.part files?

To change Thunderbird’s settings, open Thunderbird and go to Edit > Preferences > Attachments. From there, you can modify the ‘Save files to’ option and choose a different directory where Thunderbird will save the temporary files. This helps keep your desktop clean and organized.

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