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How To Extend Ubuntu Disk Space When Not Using Full Capacity

Ubuntu 13

In this article, we will delve into the process of extending Ubuntu disk space when it’s not utilizing its full capacity. This situation can often occur when you’ve allocated more disk space than what’s currently being used. Let’s explore how to effectively resize the Logical Volume Manager (LVM) volume and the underlying file system to make use of all available disk space.

Quick Answer

To extend Ubuntu disk space when not using full capacity, you can use the Logical Volume Manager (LVM) to resize the logical volume and the underlying file system. Identify the logical volume using the lsblk command, extend it using the lvextend command, and resize the file system using the resize2fs command. Finally, verify the disk space using the lsblk command again.

Understanding the Logical Volume Manager (LVM)

Before we get started, it’s important to understand what LVM is. LVM is a device mapper target that provides logical volume management for the Linux kernel. It’s essentially a method of allocating space on mass-storage devices that’s more flexible than conventional partitioning methods.

Identifying the Logical Volume

The first step in this process is to identify the logical volume that needs to be resized. In Ubuntu, you can do this by opening a terminal and running the lsblk command. This command lists information about all available block devices, which are the devices your system uses to read and write data. The output will look something like this:

$ lsblk
NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda 8:0 0 100G 0 disk 
├─sda1 8:1 0 1G 0 part /boot
└─sda2 8:2 0 99G 0 part 
 ├─ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv 253:0 0 20G 0 lvm /
 └─ubuntu--vg-swap_1 253:1 0 1G 0 lvm [SWAP]

In this example, the logical volume we need to resize is /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv.

Extending the Logical Volume

Now that we’ve identified the logical volume, we can use the lvextend command to increase its size. The lvextend command is part of the LVM tools and is used to add space to a logical volume. The -l option is used to specify the number of logical extents to add, and +100%FREE tells the command to add all of the free space in the volume group to the logical volume.

Run the following command in the terminal:

$ sudo lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv

After executing the command, you should see a message confirming the successful resize.

Resizing the File System

After extending the logical volume, we need to resize the file system so it can utilize the newly added space. We can do this using the resize2fs command. This command is used to resize ext2, ext3, or ext4 file systems.

Run the following command in the terminal:

$ sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv

This command will resize the file system to match the new size of the logical volume. After executing the command, you should see a message confirming the successful resize.

Verifying the Disk Space

Finally, it’s important to verify that the disk space has been properly extended. You can do this by running the lsblk command again. The size of the logical volume should now reflect the full available disk space.

Conclusion

In this article, we’ve covered how to extend the disk space in Ubuntu when it’s not using its full capacity. By resizing the logical volume and the underlying file system, you can ensure that your system is utilizing all of the available disk space. Remember to always back up your data before making changes to your system’s disk space.

What is the purpose of extending disk space in Ubuntu?

The purpose of extending disk space in Ubuntu is to make use of the available free space on your system’s storage device. This allows you to allocate more storage capacity to your Ubuntu system, enabling you to store more data and install additional software.

Can I extend the disk space in Ubuntu without losing any data?

Yes, you can extend the disk space in Ubuntu without losing any data. The process involves resizing the logical volume and file system, which does not involve data loss. However, it’s always recommended to backup your important data before making any changes to your system’s disk space, as a precautionary measure.

What is Logical Volume Manager (LVM)?

Logical Volume Manager (LVM) is a device mapper target that provides logical volume management for the Linux kernel. It allows for flexible allocation of storage space on mass-storage devices, providing advantages over traditional partitioning methods. LVM allows you to dynamically resize logical volumes, create snapshots, and manage storage volumes more efficiently.

How can I identify the logical volume that needs to be resized in Ubuntu?

To identify the logical volume that needs to be resized in Ubuntu, open a terminal and run the lsblk command. This command displays information about all available block devices, including the logical volumes. Look for the logical volume with the appropriate size and file system mount point to determine which one needs to be resized.

What command is used to extend the logical volume in Ubuntu?

The lvextend command is used to extend the logical volume in Ubuntu. It is part of the LVM tools and allows you to add space to a logical volume. By specifying the number of logical extents to add or using the +100%FREE option, you can increase the size of the logical volume.

How do I resize the file system after extending the logical volume?

After extending the logical volume, you can resize the file system using the resize2fs command. This command is specifically used to resize ext2, ext3, or ext4 file systems in Ubuntu. Running sudo resize2fs /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv resizes the file system to match the new size of the logical volume.

How can I verify if the disk space has been properly extended?

To verify if the disk space has been properly extended, you can run the lsblk command again in the terminal. The size of the logical volume should now reflect the full available disk space. Additionally, you can check the available disk space using the df -h command, which shows the disk usage and available space for all mounted file systems.

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