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How To Find Your Connected Wi-Fi Network Name Using Command Line

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In the modern world, command line interfaces (CLI) are a powerful tool that provide users with more control over their systems. One such use is finding the name of the Wi-Fi network you’re connected to. This article will guide you through several methods to achieve this using the command line.

Quick Answer

To find your connected Wi-Fi network name using the command line, you can use the iwgetid command with the -r parameter to display only the SSID, or the nmcli command with filters and the cut command to extract the SSID. Additionally, you can use the iwconfig command to display the ESSID or the iw command to display the Wi-Fi link parameters, including the SSID.

What is Wi-Fi Network Name?

The Wi-Fi network name, also known as Service Set Identifier (SSID), is the name that identifies a wireless network. All devices in the network use this unique identifier to connect to the correct network.

Using iwgetid Command

The iwgetid command is a simple and straightforward way to find your connected Wi-Fi network name.

iwgetid

This command will display the full details of your wireless connection, including the SSID. If you want to display only the SSID, use the -r parameter:

iwgetid -r

The -r parameter tells the command to reduce the output to just the SSID.

If you’re writing a Bash script and want to store the SSID in a variable, you can use the following command:

myssid=$(iwgetid -r)

Using nmcli Command

The nmcli command is a command-line client for NetworkManager. It can be used to report network connections, and create, edit, activate/deactivate, and delete network connections, among other tasks.

To find your connected Wi-Fi network name, use the following command:

nmcli -t -f active,ssid dev wifi | egrep '^yes' | cut -d\' -f2

The -t parameter is used to produce terse output, the -f parameter specifies the fields to output, and egrep '^yes' filters the output to lines that start with ‘yes’. The cut command is used to extract the SSID from the output.

Using iwconfig Command

The iwconfig command is used to configure a wireless network interface. You can use it to find your connected Wi-Fi network name:

iwconfig | grep wlan0

Replace wlan0 with your interface name. This command will display the ESSID of the currently connected Wi-Fi network.

Using iw Command

The iw command is a new nl80211 based CLI configuration utility for wireless devices. It supports almost all new drivers that have been added to the kernel recently. To find your connected Wi-Fi network name, use the following command:

iw dev wlan0 link

Replace wlan0 with your interface name. This command will display the Wi-Fi link parameters, including the currently associated SSID.

Conclusion

Understanding how to find your connected Wi-Fi network name using the command line can be a useful skill, especially when troubleshooting network issues. The commands and methods listed above should help you easily identify your SSID. Remember to replace wlan0 with the appropriate interface name for your system. If you’re unsure about your interface name, you can use the ip link show command to list all network interfaces.

Remember, the command line is a powerful tool, but with great power comes great responsibility. Always be careful when executing commands, especially when logged in as a root user.

What is the difference between Wi-Fi network name and SSID?

The Wi-Fi network name and SSID refer to the same thing. SSID stands for Service Set Identifier and it is the name that identifies a wireless network.

How can I find my connected Wi-Fi network name using the command line?

There are several commands you can use to find your connected Wi-Fi network name using the command line. You can use iwgetid, nmcli, iwconfig, or iw commands. Each command provides a different way to retrieve the SSID of your connected Wi-Fi network.

How do I use the `iwgetid` command to find my Wi-Fi network name?

To use the iwgetid command, open the command line interface and type iwgetid. This command will display the full details of your wireless connection, including the SSID. If you want to display only the SSID, use the -r parameter like this: iwgetid -r. This will reduce the output to just the SSID.

Can I store the Wi-Fi network name in a variable using the `iwgetid` command?

Yes, you can store the Wi-Fi network name (SSID) in a variable using the iwgetid command. In a Bash script, you can use the following command: myssid=$(iwgetid -r). This will assign the SSID to the myssid variable, which you can then use in your script.

Are there any other commands I can use to find my Wi-Fi network name?

Yes, apart from iwgetid, you can also use the nmcli, iwconfig, and iw commands to find your Wi-Fi network name. Each command provides a different way to retrieve the SSID of your connected Wi-Fi network. Choose the command that works best for your system and preferences.

Is it possible to find the Wi-Fi network name without using the command line?

Yes, it is possible to find the Wi-Fi network name without using the command line. On most operating systems, you can usually find the Wi-Fi network name by checking the network settings or by clicking on the Wi-Fi icon in the system tray. The network name (SSID) should be listed there along with other network details.

What should I do if I can’t find my Wi-Fi network name using the command line?

If you are unable to find your Wi-Fi network name using the command line, there could be a few possible reasons. First, make sure that you are connected to a Wi-Fi network. If you are not connected, the commands may not provide any output. Additionally, double-check that you are using the correct command and interface name for your system. If the issue persists, it may be helpful to consult the documentation or seek assistance from your system administrator or technical support.

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