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How To Fix “grub-efi-amd64-signed” and “shim-signed” Errors After Upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04

Ubuntu 12

In this article, we will delve into how to fix the “grub-efi-amd64-signed” and “shim-signed” errors that you might encounter after upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04. These errors are typically related to the installation and configuration of the aforementioned packages, which can cause issues during the upgrade process.

Quick Answer

To fix the "grub-efi-amd64-signed" and "shim-signed" errors after upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04, you can try purging and reinstalling the packages or manually deleting the "grub" file and reinstalling the grub-efi package. However, please note that these solutions may not work for everyone and there is a risk of breaking the bootloader. Always backup your data before making any major changes to your system.

Understanding the Error

The error messages related to “grub-efi-amd64-signed” and “shim-signed” usually indicate that there are issues with the bootloader. Despite these errors, your Ubuntu system will still be installed, but you may encounter problems when booting up your machine.

Solution 1: Purge and Reinstall the Packages

One of the most common solutions to this problem involves purging the problematic packages and reinstalling them. Here’s how you can do it:

sudo apt-get purge grub\*
sudo apt-get install grub-efi
sudo apt-get autoremove
sudo update-grub

Let’s break down what each of these commands does:

  • sudo apt-get purge grub\*: This command removes the grub packages and their configuration files. The asterisk (*) is a wildcard that matches all packages starting with “grub”.
  • sudo apt-get install grub-efi: This command installs the grub-efi package, which is necessary for the system to boot.
  • sudo apt-get autoremove: This command removes packages that were automatically installed to satisfy dependencies for other packages and are now no longer needed.
  • sudo update-grub: This command updates the GRUB bootloader.

Please note that this solution may not work for all users and there is a risk of breaking the bootloader, so proceed with caution.

Solution 2: Manually Delete the Grub File

Another solution that has worked for some users involves manually deleting the “grub” file in the “/etc/default/” directory and then reinstalling the grub-efi package. Here’s how you can do it:

sudo rm /etc/default/grub
sudo apt-get install grub-efi

The sudo rm /etc/default/grub command deletes the “grub” file, and the sudo apt-get install grub-efi command reinstalls the grub-efi package.

Conclusion

Fixing the “grub-efi-amd64-signed” and “shim-signed” errors after upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04 can be a bit tricky, but the solutions mentioned above should help you resolve the issues. However, it’s important to remember that these solutions are based on user experiences and may not work for everyone. Always backup your important data before making any major changes to your system. If you’re still having trouble, consult the official Ubuntu documentation or seek further assistance from the Ubuntu community.

What are the “grub-efi-amd64-signed” and “shim-signed” errors?

The "grub-efi-amd64-signed" and "shim-signed" errors are related to the installation and configuration of the bootloader packages in Ubuntu. These errors can cause problems during the boot process after upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04.

Can I still use my Ubuntu system if I encounter these errors?

Yes, despite encountering these errors, your Ubuntu system will still be installed. However, you may face issues when booting up your machine.

What is the first solution to fix these errors?

The first solution involves purging and reinstalling the problematic packages. You can do this by running the following commands:

sudo apt-get purge grub\*
sudo apt-get install grub-efi
sudo apt-get autoremove
sudo update-grub

Please note that this solution may not work for all users and there is a risk of breaking the bootloader, so proceed with caution.

Is there an alternative solution to fix these errors?

Yes, another solution that has worked for some users involves manually deleting the "grub" file in the "/etc/default/" directory and then reinstalling the grub-efi package. You can do this by running the following commands:

sudo rm /etc/default/grub
sudo apt-get install grub-efi
What does the second solution do?

The sudo rm /etc/default/grub command deletes the "grub" file, and the sudo apt-get install grub-efi command reinstalls the grub-efi package.

Are these solutions guaranteed to work for everyone?

These solutions are based on user experiences and may not work for everyone. It’s always a good idea to backup your important data before making any major changes to your system. If you’re still having trouble, consult the official Ubuntu documentation or seek further assistance from the Ubuntu community.

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