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How To Fix Grub Minimal Bash-Like Error and Make Grub Menu Appear in Dual Booting?

Ubuntu 13

In the world of dual booting, encountering the GRUB minimal bash-like error can be a daunting experience. This error occurs when the GRUB bootloader fails to locate the grub.cfg file, which contains the boot menu entries. But don’t worry, in this article, we will walk you through two comprehensive solutions to fix this error and make the GRUB menu appear during booting.

Quick Answer

To fix the GRUB minimal bash-like error and make the GRUB menu appear in dual booting, you can try using the Boot-Repair tool or reinstalling GRUB. The Boot-Repair tool is a simple and effective solution for repairing boot issues, while reinstalling GRUB involves reinstalling the bootloader on your system. If these solutions don’t work, seeking further assistance from the Ubuntu community or forums may be necessary.

Solution 1: Using Boot-Repair Tool

The Boot-Repair tool is a simple and effective tool for repairing frequent boot issues you may encounter in Ubuntu and other Linux distributions. It can repair GRUB, restore the boot sector, and more.

Step 1: Boot into Ubuntu Using a Live USB

First, you need to create a Live USB of Ubuntu and boot your system using this Live USB.

Step 2: Install Boot-Repair Tool

Once you’ve booted into Ubuntu, open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T. Now, you need to add the Boot-Repair repository, update your system, and install the Boot-Repair tool. Run the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair

The sudo command gives you administrative rights to run the subsequent commands. add-apt-repository adds the PPA (Personal Package Archive) to your system’s software sources. apt-get update updates the package lists for upgrades and new package installations. apt-get install installs the specified package, in this case, boot-repair.

Step 3: Run Boot-Repair Tool

Launch the Boot-Repair tool by typing boot-repair in the terminal. A menu will appear. Select the recommended repair option. The tool will automatically detect the problem and fix it.

boot-repair

After the repair, reboot your system. If your system boots normally, you’ve successfully fixed the problem. If not, you can find a link to the reported problems in the Boot-Repair tool, which you can post in Ubuntu forums for further assistance.

Solution 2: Reinstalling GRUB

If the Boot-Repair tool doesn’t work, you can try reinstalling GRUB.

Step 1: Boot into Ubuntu

Boot your system into Ubuntu.

Step 2: Open Terminal

Open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T.

Step 3: Install GRUB

Now, we will reinstall GRUB. Run the following command:

sudo grub-install /dev/sda

Here, grub-install command installs GRUB on your system. /dev/sda is the disk where GRUB will be installed. Replace /dev/sda with your disk if it’s different. Remember to install GRUB on the disk, not on a partition like /dev/sda1.

Step 4: Update GRUB

After the installation of GRUB, you need to update it. Run the following command:

sudo update-grub2

The update-grub2 command updates the GRUB bootloader.

Step 5: Reboot System

Reboot your system. If everything went well, the GRUB menu should now appear during booting without having to enter any commands.

If none of the above solutions work, it could be due to a specific issue with your system. In that case, it’s recommended to seek further assistance from the Ubuntu community or Ubuntu forums to troubleshoot the problem.

Remember, while these errors can be frustrating, they’re also an opportunity to learn more about how your system works. With patience and a methodical approach, you can resolve these issues and gain a deeper understanding of your system in the process.

What is GRUB?

GRUB (Grand Unified Bootloader) is a boot loader package that allows users to choose between different operating systems installed on a computer when it starts up.

Why am I encountering the GRUB minimal bash-like error?

The GRUB minimal bash-like error occurs when the GRUB bootloader fails to locate the grub.cfg file, which contains the boot menu entries. This can happen due to various reasons, such as incorrect configuration, disk errors, or system updates.

Can I encounter the GRUB minimal bash-like error in Windows?

No, the GRUB minimal bash-like error is specific to systems running Linux distributions that use GRUB as the bootloader. Windows systems use a different bootloader called Windows Boot Manager.

What is a Live USB?

A Live USB is a USB drive that contains a fully functional operating system that can be booted and run directly from the USB drive, without the need for installation on the computer’s hard drive.

How can I create a Live USB of Ubuntu?

To create a Live USB of Ubuntu, you can use tools like Rufus (for Windows) or Etcher (for Windows, macOS, and Linux). These tools allow you to select the Ubuntu ISO file and write it to the USB drive, making it bootable.

What should I do if the Boot-Repair tool doesn’t work?

If the Boot-Repair tool doesn’t work, you can try reinstalling GRUB manually using the steps provided in Solution 2. If that doesn’t work either, it’s recommended to seek further assistance from the Ubuntu community or forums to troubleshoot the problem.

Is it safe to reinstall GRUB?

Reinstalling GRUB is generally safe and a common troubleshooting step for GRUB-related issues. However, it’s always a good idea to backup important data before making any changes to your system, just to be on the safe side.

Can I use the Boot-Repair tool on other Linux distributions?

Yes, the Boot-Repair tool can be used on various Linux distributions, not just Ubuntu. It is designed to help repair common boot issues across different distributions.

How can I access the terminal in Ubuntu?

To access the terminal in Ubuntu, you can press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard. This will open a new terminal window where you can enter commands.

What should I do if none of the solutions work?

If none of the solutions provided in this article work for you, it could be due to a specific issue with your system. In that case, it’s recommended to seek further assistance from the Ubuntu community or forums, where experienced users can help troubleshoot the problem based on your specific configuration.

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