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How To Fix Ubuntu 18.10 Stuck on “Started bpfilter” While Booting

Ubuntu 18

When using Ubuntu 18.10, you might encounter an issue where your system gets stuck on the “Started bpfilter” message during boot. This can be a frustrating problem to deal with, but there are several solutions available that can help you resolve this issue. In this article, we will walk you through these solutions in detail.

Understanding the Issue

Before we dive into the solutions, it’s important to understand what “Started bpfilter” means. Bpfilter is short for Berkeley Packet Filter, a technology used for network-related tasks. When you see the “Started bpfilter” message during boot, it means that Ubuntu is initializing this component. However, if the system gets stuck on this message, it indicates that there is an issue preventing the boot process from progressing.

Solution 1: Edit the GDM3 Configuration File

One potential solution to this issue is to edit the GDM3 configuration file. GDM3 is the GNOME Display Manager, a utility used by Ubuntu to manage its graphical display. Here’s how you can do it:

  1. Open the terminal.
  2. Type the following command to open the GDM3 configuration file in a text editor:
sudo nano /etc/gdm3/custom.conf
  1. In the file, you’ll find a line that says #WaylandEnable=false. The # symbol at the beginning of the line means that this line is commented out, and thus ignored by the system. To uncomment this line, remove the # symbol.
  2. Save the file by pressing Ctrl+X, then Y to confirm, and finally Enter to exit.
  3. Reboot your system to see if the issue has been resolved.

Solution 2: Remove Nvidia Proprietary Drivers

If the first solution doesn’t work for you, another option is to remove the Nvidia proprietary drivers. These drivers can sometimes cause conflicts that prevent the system from booting properly. Here’s how you can remove them:

  1. Reboot your system and hold down the Shift key during boot to enter recovery mode.
  2. In recovery mode, open the terminal and type the following command:
sudo apt-get remove --purge nvidia-*

This command will remove all Nvidia drivers from your system. Be aware that this may affect your system’s graphics performance, particularly if you use your system for gaming or other graphics-intensive tasks.

Solution 3: Install SLiM or LightDM Display Manager

Another potential solution is to install a different display manager. Two popular options are SLiM and LightDM. Here’s how you can install them:

  1. Enter recovery mode and open the terminal.
  2. To install SLiM, type the following command:
sudo apt-get install slim
  1. To switch to SLiM as your display manager, type the following command:
sudo dpkg-reconfigure gdm3
  1. If SLiM doesn’t work for you, you can try installing LightDM instead. To do this, type the following command:
sudo apt-get install lightdm
  1. To switch to LightDM as your display manager, type the following command:
sudo dpkg-reconfigure lightdm

Solution 4: Check for Available Disk Space

A lack of free disk space can also cause boot issues. If your hard drive is full, you might need to delete some unnecessary files to free up space. Here’s how you can check your disk space and delete files:

  1. Enter recovery mode and open the terminal.
  2. Type the following command to check your disk usage:
df -h
  1. If your disk is full, you can use the rm command to delete unnecessary files. For example, to delete a file named example.txt in your home directory, you would type:
rm ~/example.txt

Solution 5: Switch to a Different Kernel Version

If none of the above solutions work, you might want to consider switching to a different kernel version. Sometimes, issues like this can be caused by a problematic kernel update. Here’s how you can switch to a different kernel version:

  1. Reboot your system and hold down the Shift key during boot to enter the boot menu.
  2. In the boot menu, select ‘Advanced options for Ubuntu’.
  3. Select an older kernel version from the list and press Enter to boot with that version.

Conclusion

These are some of the most common solutions to the “Started bpfilter” issue in Ubuntu 18.10. Remember, it’s always a good idea to backup your important data before making any changes to your system. If none of these solutions work, you can try searching for the specific error message or bug reports related to your Ubuntu version to find more information or possible workarounds. We hope this article helps you resolve this issue and get your system back up and running.

What is Ubuntu 18.10?

Ubuntu 18.10, also known as Cosmic Cuttlefish, is a version of the Ubuntu operating system released in October 2018. It is a short-term support (STS) release, meaning it is supported for 9 months.

How can I check if my system is stuck on the “Started bpfilter” message?

If your system is stuck on the "Started bpfilter" message during boot, you will notice that the boot process does not progress beyond this point. You may see a blinking cursor or a lack of any further activity on the screen.

Can I use Solution 1 if I am not using the GNOME desktop environment?

Solution 1, which involves editing the GDM3 configuration file, is specifically for systems using the GNOME Display Manager (GDM3). If you are not using the GNOME desktop environment, this solution may not be applicable to your system.

Will removing the Nvidia proprietary drivers affect my system’s graphics performance?

Yes, removing the Nvidia proprietary drivers can affect your system’s graphics performance, especially if you use your system for gaming or other graphics-intensive tasks. It is recommended to have alternative drivers or solutions in place before removing the Nvidia drivers.

Can I install both SLiM and LightDM display managers simultaneously?

Yes, you can have both SLiM and LightDM display managers installed on your system simultaneously. However, you can only use one display manager at a time. You can switch between them using the sudo dpkg-reconfigure command as mentioned in Solution 3.

How can I enter recovery mode to perform these solutions?

To enter recovery mode, you need to reboot your system and hold down the Shift key during boot. This will bring up the GRUB menu where you can select the recovery mode option.

What should I do if none of the solutions work for me?

If none of the solutions provided in this article work for you, it is recommended to search for the specific error message or bug reports related to your Ubuntu version. This can help you find more information or possible workarounds for your specific issue. Additionally, seeking assistance from the Ubuntu community forums or support channels may also be helpful in finding a solution.

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