Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

How To Fix Ubuntu 18.10 Stuck at ‘Started GNOME Display Manager’ and Keyboard Not Working

Ubuntu 20

In this article, we will explore a common issue experienced by Ubuntu 18.10 users where the system gets stuck at the ‘Started GNOME Display Manager’ screen and the keyboard stops working. This can be a frustrating problem, but don’t worry, we have a potential solution for you.

Quick Answer

To fix Ubuntu 18.10 stuck at ‘Started GNOME Display Manager’ and keyboard not working, you can try disabling Wayland by editing the custom.conf file in the gdm3 directory. This can often resolve the issue and allow you to boot into Ubuntu successfully.

Understanding the Issue

The issue typically arises due to compatibility problems between Wayland, the default GNOME display server, and older GPU models. Wayland is a protocol that specifies the communication between a display server and its clients. However, it can cause issues with older GPUs, leading to the ‘Started GNOME Display Manager’ error and the keyboard not working.

Solution: Disabling Wayland

A possible solution to this problem is to disable Wayland. This can be done by editing the custom.conf file in the gdm3 directory.

Step 1: Boot into Recovery Mode

First, reboot your computer. As it starts up, hold down the Shift key to access the GRUB boot menu. From this menu, select the ‘Advanced options for Ubuntu’ and then select the recovery mode option.

Step 2: Gain Root Access

In the recovery menu, select the ‘root’ option. This will give you root access to your system.

Step 3: Remount the Disk as Read-Write

By default, the disk is mounted as read-only in recovery mode. To make changes, you need to remount it as read-write. To do this, type the following command:

sudo mount -o remount,rw /

The -o option allows you to specify several filesystem options. In this case, remount,rw is used to remount the filesystem as read-write.

Step 4: Edit the custom.conf File

Next, you need to edit the custom.conf file. You can do this using the pico text editor by typing:

sudo pico /etc/gdm3/custom.conf

Pico is a simple, display-oriented text editor. The /etc/gdm3/custom.conf is the path to the file you want to edit.

Step 5: Disable Wayland

In the custom.conf file, find the line that says #WaylandEnable=false. The # at the beginning of the line means that the line is commented out, and therefore not active. To disable Wayland, you need to uncomment this line by removing the #.

Step 6: Save and Exit

After making the change, save the file and exit the editor. In pico, you can do this by pressing Ctrl+X, then Y to confirm that you want to save the changes, and finally Enter to confirm the file name.

Step 7: Reboot

Finally, reboot your system by typing reboot and pressing Enter.

Alternative Solution for Windows Hyper-V VM Users

If you are using Ubuntu 18.10 on a Windows Hyper-V VM and experiencing the same issue, you can try pressing Alt+F2 to access the secondary TTY terminal. From there, you can log in and follow the same steps as above to edit the custom.conf file and disable Wayland.

Conclusion

The ‘Started GNOME Display Manager’ and keyboard not working issue in Ubuntu 18.10 can be a nuisance, but it can often be resolved by disabling Wayland. We hope that this guide has helped you to resolve the issue. If you are still experiencing difficulties, it may be helpful to consult the Ubuntu community forums or seek further assistance from a professional.

What is Wayland and why does it cause issues with Ubuntu 18.10?

Wayland is a protocol that specifies the communication between a display server and its clients. It is the default GNOME display server in Ubuntu 18.10. However, it can cause compatibility problems with older GPU models, leading to the ‘Started GNOME Display Manager’ error and the keyboard not working.

How do I access the GRUB boot menu in Ubuntu 18.10?

To access the GRUB boot menu, restart your computer and hold down the Shift key during startup. This will bring up the GRUB menu where you can select the ‘Advanced options for Ubuntu’ and then the recovery mode option.

How do I gain root access in the recovery mode?

In the recovery mode menu, select the ‘root’ option. This will give you root access to your system, allowing you to make changes.

How do I remount the disk as read-write in recovery mode?

By default, the disk is mounted as read-only in recovery mode. To remount it as read-write, use the command sudo mount -o remount,rw /. This will allow you to make changes to the filesystem.

How do I edit the custom.conf file?

To edit the custom.conf file, use the pico text editor by typing sudo pico /etc/gdm3/custom.conf. This will open the file in the pico editor, allowing you to make changes.

How do I disable Wayland in the custom.conf file?

In the custom.conf file, find the line that says #WaylandEnable=false. Remove the # at the beginning of the line to uncomment it and disable Wayland.

How do I save and exit the custom.conf file in the pico editor?

To save and exit the custom.conf file in the pico editor, press Ctrl+X, then Y to confirm that you want to save the changes, and finally Enter to confirm the file name.

How do I access the secondary TTY terminal in a Windows Hyper-V VM?

If you are using Ubuntu 18.10 on a Windows Hyper-V VM, you can access the secondary TTY terminal by pressing Alt+F2. This will allow you to log in and follow the same steps as mentioned above to edit the custom.conf file and disable Wayland.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *