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Fixing tracker-miner-fs crashes on Ubuntu 20.04

Ubuntu 18

In this article, we will explore various solutions to fix the tracker-miner-fs crashes on Ubuntu 20.04. This issue has been reported by several users, where the tracker-miner-fs process crashes and restarts continuously after upgrading to Ubuntu 20.04, causing high CPU usage. The error message in the syslog indicates that the process fails to find parent nodes for certain URIs and throws assertions. Let’s delve into the potential solutions.

Solution 1: Remove the Tracker Database

The first solution to try is removing the tracker database. The tracker database is located at ~/.cache/tracker. You can use the rm command to remove it. Here’s how:

rm -r ~/.cache/tracker

In this command, rm is the remove command, -r is the recursive option that tells the system to delete the directory and its contents recursively. Once the command is executed, the tracker database will be deleted.

Solution 2: Disable Tracker and Reset It

If removing the tracker database doesn’t solve the problem, you can try to disable the tracker and reset it. To disable Tracker, you need to mask the Tracker systemd services. Here’s the command to do it:

systemctl --user mask tracker-store.service tracker-miner-fs.service tracker-miner-rss.service tracker-extract.service tracker-miner-apps.service tracker-writeback.service

In this command, systemctl is a system control command, --user tells the system to affect the user’s services, and mask is used to prevent the services from starting up. After masking the services, you need to reset Tracker using the following command:

tracker reset --hard

The reset command is used to reset the Tracker to its initial state, and --hard tells the system to remove all databases and configuration files. After executing these commands, reboot the system.

Solution 3: Check for System Accounts Without a Home Directory

In some cases, Tracker may run for system accounts without a home directory, causing issues. To solve this problem, you can create a home directory for the affected account. You can use the usermod command to do this:

sudo usermod -d /home/username username

In this command, usermod is a command to modify user information, -d is used to specify the user’s home directory, and username is the name of the user. Replace username with the name of the affected user.

Solution 4: Investigate Problematic Files and Exclude Them

If Tracker’s metadata miners crash due to specific file contents, it can lead to high CPU usage. To solve this issue, you can check the /tmp/tracker-extract-files.1000 directory for any symlink to a problematic file. If you find any, you can stop the tracker daemon, move the file causing the issue, or exclude the directory containing the problematic file. Here’s how to stop the tracker daemon:

tracker daemon -k

In this command, daemon is used to control the Tracker daemons, and -k is used to kill all Tracker processes. After stopping the daemon, you can move the problematic file or exclude its directory, and then restart the process.

Solution 5: Delete the Tracker3 Cache Files

Finally, if none of the above solutions work, you can try deleting the ~/.cache/tracker3/files directory and restarting the system.

rm -r ~/.cache/tracker3/files

This command works similarly to the one in Solution 1, removing the specified directory and its contents.

Please note that these solutions may not work for everyone, and it’s recommended to try them one by one until the issue is resolved. Always remember to back up your data before making any major changes to your system. If you need further assistance, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Ubuntu community for help.

What is tracker-miner-fs?

tracker-miner-fs is a component of the Tracker software, which is a search and indexing tool used in Ubuntu. It is responsible for indexing and tracking files on your system to provide efficient searching capabilities.

Why does tracker-miner-fs crash on Ubuntu 20.04?

tracker-miner-fs crashes on Ubuntu 20.04 due to various reasons, such as issues with the tracker database, conflicts with certain files or directories, or problems with system accounts without a home directory.

How can I remove the tracker database?

To remove the tracker database, you can use the rm command with the appropriate options. Open a terminal and execute the following command: rm -r ~/.cache/tracker. This will delete the tracker database located in the ~/.cache/tracker directory.

How can I disable and reset Tracker?

To disable Tracker, you need to mask the Tracker systemd services using the systemctl --user mask command. After masking the services, you can reset Tracker to its initial state by executing the command tracker reset --hard. Finally, reboot your system for the changes to take effect.

How can I create a home directory for a system account without one?

To create a home directory for a system account without one, you can use the usermod command. Open a terminal and execute the following command, replacing username with the name of the affected user: sudo usermod -d /home/username username. This will create a home directory at /home/username for the specified user.

How can I investigate and exclude problematic files causing crashes?

To investigate problematic files causing crashes, you can check the /tmp/tracker-extract-files.1000 directory for any symlink to a problematic file. If found, you can stop the tracker daemon using the command tracker daemon -k, move the file causing the issue, or exclude the directory containing the problematic file. After making the necessary changes, restart the tracker process.

What should I do if none of the solutions work?

If none of the solutions mentioned in the article work for you, you can try deleting the ~/.cache/tracker3/files directory and restarting your system. Execute the command rm -r ~/.cache/tracker3/files in a terminal to remove the directory and its contents.

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