Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

Fixing WiFi Issues on Ubuntu Server 20.04 with Netplan Configuration

Ubuntu 12

Ubuntu Server 20.04, also known as Focal Fossa, is a robust and reliable operating system used by many system administrators worldwide. However, like any other software, it can sometimes encounter problems. One common issue is connecting to Wi-Fi networks using the Netplan network configuration utility. This article will guide you through the process of troubleshooting and resolving these issues.

Quick Answer

To fix WiFi issues on Ubuntu Server 20.04 with Netplan configuration, you need to identify the WiFi interface, configure Netplan with the correct SSID and password, apply the configuration, and verify the connection. If these steps don’t resolve the issue, you can try troubleshooting by checking the SSID and password, installing wpasupplicant, checking the WiFi adapter, or trying an Ethernet connection. If all else fails, seek assistance from the Ubuntu community forums or consult with a Linux expert.

Understanding Netplan

Netplan is a utility for easily configuring networking on a Linux system. You simply create a YAML description of the required network interfaces and what each should be configured to do. From this description, Netplan will generate all the necessary configuration for your chosen renderer tool.

Identifying the Wi-Fi Interface

Before we start troubleshooting, we need to identify the Wi-Fi interface on your Ubuntu Server. You can do this by running the following command:

ls /sys/class/net

This command lists all network interfaces on your system. The output will include your Wi-Fi interface, which typically begins with ‘wl’, such as ‘wlp2s0’. Note down this name as we will need it for the configuration.

Configuring Netplan

The next step is to edit the Netplan configuration file. This file is usually located in the /etc/netplan/ directory. You can use any text editor to open this file. Ensure that the spacing and indentation are correct, as YAML files are sensitive to these.

Here’s an example configuration:

network:
 version: 2
 renderer: networkd
 wifis:
 wlp2s0:
 dhcp4: true
 access-points:
 "Your_SSID":
 password: "Your_WiFi_Password"

In this configuration:

  • version: 2 specifies the Netplan configuration version.
  • renderer: networkd tells Netplan to use the networkd backend. networkd is a system service that manages networks.
  • wifis: is the section where we define Wi-Fi interface configurations.
  • wlp2s0: is the name of the Wi-Fi interface we identified earlier.
  • dhcp4: true enables DHCP for IPv4. This will automatically assign an IP address to your interface.
  • access-points: is where we define the access points we want to connect to.
  • "Your_SSID": is the name of the Wi-Fi network you want to connect to.
  • password: "Your_WiFi_Password" is the password for the Wi-Fi network.

Replace "Your_SSID" and "Your_WiFi_Password" with your actual Wi-Fi SSID and password.

Applying the Configuration

Once you have edited the configuration file, you can apply the changes by running the following command:

sudo netplan apply --debug

This command applies the configuration and the --debug parameter helps in providing more detailed output, which is useful for troubleshooting. If there are any syntax errors in your configuration file, this command will let you know.

Verifying the Connection

After applying the configuration, reboot your system. Some users have reported that a reboot is necessary for the changes to take effect. After the system restarts, check if the Wi-Fi connection is established. You can do this by running the ping command to any website. For example:

ping -c 4 google.com

This command sends 4 packets to google.com and shows the time it took for the packets to travel. If you receive a response, it means your Wi-Fi is working properly.

Troubleshooting

If you are still experiencing problems, here are some additional steps you can take:

  • Check your SSID and password: Ensure that the Wi-Fi network name (SSID) and password are correct in the Netplan configuration.
  • Install wpasupplicant: This is a WPA client and IEEE 802.1X supplicant that can be used to connect to Wi-Fi networks. You can install it by running sudo apt-get update followed by sudo apt-get install wpasupplicant.
  • Check your Wi-Fi adapter: Make sure there are no hardware or driver issues with your Wi-Fi adapter. You can try updating the kernel or checking for any firmware updates for the adapter.
  • Try an Ethernet connection: If you have access to an Ethernet connection, try connecting via Ethernet and see if the Wi-Fi issue persists. This can help determine if the problem is specific to the Wi-Fi configuration or a broader networking issue.

If none of the above solutions work, consider seeking assistance from the Ubuntu community forums or consult with a Linux expert for further troubleshooting.

Conclusion

Wi-Fi issues on Ubuntu Server 20.04 can be frustrating, but with a proper understanding of Netplan and some basic troubleshooting steps, you can resolve these issues and get your server back online. Remember, the key to successful troubleshooting is understanding the tools at your disposal and how to use them effectively.

How can I find the Netplan configuration file on Ubuntu Server 20.04?

The Netplan configuration file is usually located in the /etc/netplan/ directory.

Can I use any text editor to edit the Netplan configuration file?

Yes, you can use any text editor of your choice to edit the Netplan configuration file. Just make sure the spacing and indentation are correct as YAML files are sensitive to these.

Do I need to reboot my system after applying the Netplan configuration changes?

It is recommended to reboot your system after applying the Netplan configuration changes as some users have reported that a reboot is necessary for the changes to take effect.

How can I check if my Wi-Fi connection is established after applying the Netplan configuration?

You can check if your Wi-Fi connection is established by running the ping command to any website. For example, you can run ping -c 4 google.com to send 4 packets to google.com and check for a response.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *