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Why aren’t my gvfs mounts showing up in ~/.gvfs or /run/user//gvfs?

Ubuntu 11

In the world of Linux, GVFS (Gnome Virtual File System) plays a crucial role in providing a layer of abstraction over the underlying file systems. It allows users to access remote and local files with ease. However, sometimes you might encounter a situation where the GVFS mounts are not showing up in ~/.gvfs or /run/user/<login>/gvfs. This article aims to provide an in-depth understanding of why this happens and how you can resolve it.

Quick Answer

The GVFS mounts may not be showing up in ~/.gvfs or /run/user/<login>/gvfs due to the gvfs-fuse-daemon process not running or not starting correctly. You can check if the process is running and try starting it manually if necessary. Additionally, the location of the GVFS mounts has changed in newer versions of Ubuntu.

Understanding GVFS

Before we delve into the problem, let’s understand what GVFS is. GVFS is a virtual file system implemented by GNOME. It provides a layer of abstraction from the physical file system and helps in accessing files on remote systems. It’s a key part of the GIO (Gnome Input/Output) framework.

The Problem

The GVFS mounts should ideally appear in ~/.gvfs or /run/user/<login>/gvfs. However, in some cases, they might not be visible. This could be due to a variety of reasons, which we will explore in the following sections.

GVFS-Fuse-Daemon Not Running

The gvfs-fuse-daemon process is responsible for creating the fuse mount point. If it’s not running, the mounts will not be visible. You can check if it is running by using the command ps aux | grep gvfs-fuse-daemon.

Here, ps is a command that reports a snapshot of the current processes, aux is a combination of three parameters:

  • a lists all processes from all users
  • u provides detailed information
  • x also lists processes not attached to a terminal

The grep command is used to search the output for the string gvfs-fuse-daemon.

If the gvfs-fuse-daemon is not running, you can try starting it manually with the command /usr/lib/gvfs/gvfs-fuse-daemon ~/.gvfs (or /usr/lib/gvfs/gvfsd-fuse ~/.gvfs on Ubuntu 14.04).

GVFS-Fuse-Daemon Did Not Start Correctly

Another possible reason is that the ~/.gvfs directory is empty because gvfs-fuse-daemon did not start correctly. In this case, you can try deleting and recreating the ~/.gvfs directory, or checking if anything else is mounted there.

Change in GVFS Mounts Location

It’s also worth noting that the location of the GVFS mounts has changed in newer versions of Ubuntu. In Ubuntu 12.10 and later, the mounts can be found under /run/user/<login>/gvfs instead of ~/.gvfs.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the visibility of GVFS mounts in ~/.gvfs or /run/user/<login>/gvfs is primarily dependent on the gvfs-fuse-daemon process. If it’s not running or did not start correctly, the mounts may not be visible in those directories. Understanding these nuances can help you troubleshoot effectively when GVFS mounts are not showing up as expected.

Remember, the Linux community is vast and helpful. If you’re still facing issues, don’t hesitate to reach out to forums or communities for further assistance.

How can I check if the `gvfs-fuse-daemon` process is running?

You can check if the gvfs-fuse-daemon process is running by using the command ps aux | grep gvfs-fuse-daemon. This command will show you the running processes and you can check if gvfs-fuse-daemon is among them.

What should I do if the `gvfs-fuse-daemon` is not running?

If the gvfs-fuse-daemon is not running, you can try starting it manually with the command /usr/lib/gvfs/gvfs-fuse-daemon ~/.gvfs (or /usr/lib/gvfs/gvfsd-fuse ~/.gvfs on Ubuntu 14.04). This command will start the gvfs-fuse-daemon process and create the necessary fuse mount point.

Why is the `~/.gvfs` directory empty?

The ~/.gvfs directory might be empty if the gvfs-fuse-daemon did not start correctly. In this case, you can try deleting and recreating the ~/.gvfs directory, or checking if anything else is mounted there.

Where can I find the GVFS mounts in newer versions of Ubuntu?

In newer versions of Ubuntu (12.10 and later), the GVFS mounts can be found under /run/user/<login>/gvfs instead of ~/.gvfs. The location has been changed for better integration and security.

What is GVFS and why is it important?

GVFS (Gnome Virtual File System) is a virtual file system implemented by GNOME. It provides a layer of abstraction from the physical file system and helps in accessing files on remote systems. It’s an essential part of the GIO (Gnome Input/Output) framework and enables seamless file access for users.

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