Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

How To Restart OpenVPN Service Running Under ‘nobody’ User on Ubuntu Server

Ubuntu 5

In this article, we will guide you through the process of restarting the OpenVPN service running under the ‘nobody’ user on an Ubuntu Server. This task is essential for system administrators managing VPN services, as it helps ensure the smooth running of the VPN service.

Quick Answer

To restart the OpenVPN service running under the ‘nobody’ user on an Ubuntu Server, you can use the systemctl command. Identify the service name using the ls command in the /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants directory, and then run systemctl restart <service-name>. If you encounter any issues, you can try alternative solutions such as using the service command, resolving conflicts with Docker, or finding the closest matching service name using systemctl status openvpn*.

Prerequisites

Before we begin, ensure you have:

  • An Ubuntu Server with OpenVPN installed.
  • Root or sudo access to the server.

Identifying the OpenVPN Service

Firstly, we need to identify the exact service name for OpenVPN. Open a terminal and log in as the root user using the command:

sudo su

Next, check the files in the /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants directory. Look for a file that starts with openvpn and ends with .service. This can be done using the ls command:

ls /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants

The output should include a file named something like openvpn-server@server.service. This is the service name we need.

Restarting the OpenVPN Service

Once you have identified the service name, you can use the systemctl command to restart the service. The systemctl command is a utility for controlling the systemd system and service manager.

Run the following command, replacing <service-name> with the actual service name you found in the previous step:

systemctl restart <service-name>

For example, if the service name is openvpn-server@server.service, the command would be:

systemctl restart openvpn-server@server.service

This will restart the OpenVPN service running under the ‘nobody’ user.

Troubleshooting

If you encounter any issues or the above steps don’t work, you can try the following alternative solutions:

Solution 1: Using the service command

You can stop and start the OpenVPN service using the service command. Run the following commands as the root user:

service openvpn stop
service openvpn start

The service command runs a System V init script in as predictable an environment as possible, removing most environment variables and with the current working directory set to /.

Solution 2: Conflict with Docker

If you have Docker running on the same machine, there might be a conflict. In this case, stop Docker first and then try starting the OpenVPN server.

Solution 3: Finding the closest matching service name

If you don’t know the exact service name or want a shortcut, you can run systemctl status openvpn* to find the closest matching service name. This will show you the status of all services starting with “openvpn”.

Conclusion

Restarting the OpenVPN service running under the ‘nobody’ user on an Ubuntu Server is a straightforward process once you know the exact service name. By following the steps outlined in this guide, you should be able to successfully restart your OpenVPN service. Remember to run these commands as the root user or using sudo to have the necessary permissions to restart the service.

How do I check if OpenVPN is installed on my Ubuntu Server?

You can check if OpenVPN is installed on your Ubuntu Server by running the command openvpn --version. If OpenVPN is installed, it will display the version number.

Can I restart the OpenVPN service without root or sudo access?

No, restarting the OpenVPN service requires root or sudo access as it involves administrative permissions to control the systemd system and service manager.

How do I stop the OpenVPN service?

To stop the OpenVPN service, you can use the command systemctl stop <service-name>, replacing <service-name> with the actual service name. For example, systemctl stop openvpn-server@server.service.

How do I start the OpenVPN service?

To start the OpenVPN service, you can use the command systemctl start <service-name>, replacing <service-name> with the actual service name. For example, systemctl start openvpn-server@server.service.

How do I check the status of the OpenVPN service?

You can check the status of the OpenVPN service by running the command systemctl status <service-name>, replacing <service-name> with the actual service name. For example, systemctl status openvpn-server@server.service.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *