Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

How To Run a Script Without Closing Terminal

Ubuntu 12

Running scripts in a terminal is a common task for system administrators, developers, and power users. However, by default, the terminal window closes after the script finishes executing, which can be inconvenient if you want to review the output. In this article, we will explore how to run a script without closing the terminal.

Quick Answer

To run a script without closing the terminal, you can use terminal emulators like gnome-terminal or xterm with specific command options. Alternatively, you can use bash’s –init-file option or add the read command at the end of the script to make the terminal wait for an input.

Using gnome-terminal

Gnome-terminal is a terminal emulator for the GNOME desktop environment. You can use it to run a script and keep the terminal open after the script finishes. Here’s how:

gnome-terminal -e "bash -c ~/script.sh;bash"

In this command, -e is a parameter that tells gnome-terminal to execute the following string. bash -c ~/script.sh runs the script located at ~/script.sh. ;bash keeps the terminal open after the script finishes.

Using xterm

Xterm is a terminal emulator for the X Window System. Similar to gnome-terminal, you can use xterm to run a script and keep the terminal open. Here’s the command:

xterm -e "bash ~/script.sh;bash"

In this command, -e is a parameter that tells xterm to execute the following string. bash ~/script.sh runs the script located at ~/script.sh. ;bash keeps the terminal open after the script finishes.

Using bash’s –init-file option

Bash, the default shell in many Linux distributions, has an --init-file option that you can use to run a script and keep the terminal open. Here’s how:

bash --init-file <(echo './<script_name>')

In this command, --init-file tells bash to read the following file before starting. <(echo './<script_name>') creates a temporary pipe with the content ./<script_name>, which runs the script.

Adding read at the end of the script

If you have access to the script, you can add the read command at the end. This command makes the terminal wait for an input before closing, allowing you to press Enter when you’re ready to close the terminal. Here’s an example:

#!/bin/bash
# script content
read

In this script, #!/bin/bash is the shebang that tells the system to use bash to execute the script. read waits for an input.

Before running any script, remember to make it executable using the chmod +x script.sh command.

Conclusion

Running a script without closing the terminal can be achieved using various methods, depending on your terminal emulator and whether you have access to the script. By using these methods, you can review the script’s output at your leisure before closing the terminal.

Can I use these methods to run any type of script?

Yes, you can use these methods to run scripts written in any scripting language as long as the script is executable and can be run from the command line.

Do I need to have GNOME or X Window System installed to use gnome-terminal or xterm?

Yes, gnome-terminal and xterm are terminal emulators specific to the GNOME and X Window System environments, respectively. You need to have the corresponding desktop environment installed to use these terminal emulators.

Can I use these methods on Windows?

No, these methods are specific to Linux and Unix-like operating systems. Windows has its own terminal emulators and command line tools that can be used to achieve similar results.

How can I make a script executable?

You can make a script executable by using the chmod +x script.sh command, where script.sh is the name of your script file. This command grants execute permissions to the script file.

Can I use these methods to run multiple scripts consecutively?

Yes, you can modify the commands to run multiple scripts consecutively. For example, in gnome-terminal, you can use gnome-terminal -e "bash -c script1.sh; bash -c script2.sh; bash" to run script1.sh and then script2.sh.

Will the terminal stay open indefinitely after running the script?

No, the terminal will stay open until you manually close it or until you exit the shell session. If you want the terminal to stay open for a specific duration, you can use the sleep command in your script to introduce a delay before the script completes.

Is it possible to run a script without any terminal window opening?

Yes, you can run a script without any terminal window opening by using the nohup command. For example, nohup script.sh & runs script.sh in the background without attaching it to the terminal, allowing it to continue running even after you close the terminal.

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