Software & AppsOperating SystemLinux

How To Save AlsaMixer Settings?

Ubuntu 14

AlsaMixer is a graphical mixer program for the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) that is used to configure sound settings and adjust the audio levels. It is a powerful tool, but one common question is how to save the settings in AlsaMixer. In this article, we’ll go through several methods to save your AlsaMixer settings.

Quick Answer

To save AlsaMixer settings, you can use the alsactl store command to save the settings to the default configuration file, or use the --file parameter to save them to a custom file. Another option is to create a .desktop file in the autostart directory to automatically restore the settings on startup. Additionally, you can use a script and crontab to restore the settings on every system boot.

Method 1: Using alsactl store

The first and simplest method to save AlsaMixer settings is by using the alsactl store command. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Open a terminal.
  2. Type and execute the command sudo alsactl store.

This command will save the current AlsaMixer configurations to the default file /etc/asound.state. The store parameter tells alsactl to save the current driver state for the soundcard to the configuration file. The sudo command is used to execute the command with root privileges, which is necessary because the configuration file is usually protected.

The settings stored in this file will be loaded automatically on every startup. This is because most Linux distributions have a service that runs alsactl restore at boot time, which loads the settings from the configuration file.

Method 2: Using a Custom File with alsactl

If you want to save your settings to a custom file, you can do so with the --file parameter. Here’s how:

  1. Open a terminal.
  2. Type and execute the command alsactl --file ~/.config/asound.state store.

This will save the AlsaMixer settings to a custom file (~/.config/asound.state). The --file parameter specifies the configuration file to use.

To reload the settings from this file, use alsactl --file ~/.config/asound.state restore. The restore parameter tells alsactl to load the driver state from the configuration file.

Method 3: Creating a .desktop File for Autostart

Another method to automatically restore AlsaMixer settings on startup is by creating a .desktop file in the autostart directory. Here’s how:

  1. Open a terminal.
  2. Type and execute the command nano ~/.config/autostart/alsarestore.desktop.

This will open the nano text editor and create a new .desktop file named alsarestore.desktop.

  1. Add the following content to the file:
[Desktop Entry]
Type=Application
Terminal=false
Name=alsarestore
Exec=alsactl --file ~/.config/asound.state restore

The Exec line specifies the command to run when the application is launched. In this case, it will restore the AlsaMixer settings from the custom file.

  1. Save and close the file.

This .desktop file will be automatically run on startup, restoring your AlsaMixer settings.

Method 4: Using a Script and Crontab

The final method we’ll cover is using a script and crontab to restore the AlsaMixer settings on every system boot. Here’s how:

  1. Open a terminal.
  2. Create a script file (e.g., alsarestore.sh) with the following content:
#!/bin/sh
restore_alsa() {
 while [ -z "$(pidof pulseaudio)" ]; do
 sleep 1
 done
 alsactl restore 
}
restore_alsa &

This script waits for the PulseAudio server to start, then runs alsactl restore.

  1. Make the script executable by running chmod +x alsarestore.sh.

The chmod +x command changes the permissions of the file to make it executable.

  1. Add the script to the root user’s crontab by running sudo crontab -e and adding the following line:
@reboot /path/to/alsarestore.sh 2>/dev/null

Make sure to replace /path/to/ with the actual path to the script file.

The @reboot parameter tells crontab to run the command after the system boots. The 2>/dev/null part redirects error messages to null, effectively discarding them.

This will restore the AlsaMixer settings on every system boot.

Conclusion

In this article, we’ve covered several methods to save and restore your AlsaMixer settings. Whether you choose to use the alsactl store command, a custom file, a .desktop file, or a script and crontab, depends on your specific needs and preferences. Regardless of the method, with this guide, you should be able to keep your AlsaMixer settings consistent across reboots.

Can I save AlsaMixer settings to a custom file?

Yes, you can save AlsaMixer settings to a custom file by using the --file parameter with the alsactl command. For example, alsactl --file ~/.config/asound.state store will save the settings to the specified file.

How do I reload AlsaMixer settings from a custom file?

To reload AlsaMixer settings from a custom file, use the alsactl --file command followed by the path to the file. For example, alsactl --file ~/.config/asound.state restore will load the settings from the specified file.

How can I automatically restore AlsaMixer settings on startup?

There are a few methods to automatically restore AlsaMixer settings on startup. One method is by using the alsactl store command and relying on the default service that runs alsactl restore at boot time. Another method is by creating a .desktop file in the autostart directory that runs the alsactl restore command. Finally, you can use a script and add it to the root user’s crontab to run the alsactl restore command on every system boot.

Can I discard error messages when using a script and crontab to restore AlsaMixer settings?

Yes, you can discard error messages when using a script and crontab to restore AlsaMixer settings. By adding 2>/dev/null at the end of the crontab line, error messages will be redirected to null and effectively discarded.

Will the AlsaMixer settings be loaded automatically on every startup?

Yes, in most cases, the AlsaMixer settings will be loaded automatically on every startup. This is because most Linux distributions have a service that runs alsactl restore at boot time, which loads the settings from the default configuration file /etc/asound.state.

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