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How To Skip Filesystem Checks During Ubuntu 20.04 Boot on Lenovo

Ubuntu 6

In this comprehensive guide, we will walk you through the process of skipping filesystem checks during the boot process on Ubuntu 20.04, specifically for Lenovo computers. This process involves modifying the GRUB bootloader configuration, which can be a bit technical. However, we will explain each step in detail to ensure you understand what you are doing.

Please note: Skipping filesystem checks is generally not recommended unless you have a specific reason to do so. Regular filesystem checks help identify and fix filesystem errors, ensuring the integrity of your data.

Quick Answer

To skip filesystem checks during the boot process on Ubuntu 20.04 for Lenovo computers, you can modify the GRUB bootloader configuration by adding the fsck.mode=skip command line option. This can help speed up boot times, but it’s generally not recommended unless you have a specific reason to do so.

Understanding the GRUB Bootloader

GRUB (Grand Unified Bootloader) is the default bootloader for Ubuntu and many other Linux distributions. It’s the software that loads the operating system into memory when your computer starts up.

In this guide, we will be editing the GRUB configuration file to add the fsck.mode=skip command line option. This option tells GRUB to skip the filesystem check during the boot process.

Editing the GRUB Configuration File

Method 1: Editing /etc/default/grub

The first method involves editing the /etc/default/grub file. This file contains various settings that GRUB uses when generating the grub.cfg file, which is the actual configuration file that GRUB reads when booting up.

Here’s how to do it:

  1. Open the terminal. You can do this by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on your keyboard.
  2. Run the following command to open the GRUB configuration file in the nano text editor:
sudo nano /etc/default/grub
  1. Find the line that starts with GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT. This line contains the default command line options that GRUB uses when booting up.
  2. Add fsck.mode=skip just before quiet splash on the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT line. The line should now look like this:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="fsck.mode=skip quiet splash"
  1. Save the file by pressing Ctrl + O, then exit nano by pressing Ctrl + X.
  2. Update GRUB by running the following command in the terminal:
sudo update-grub

This command generates a new grub.cfg file based on the settings in /etc/default/grub.

Method 2: Editing /boot/grub/grub.cfg Directly

The second method involves editing the grub.cfg file directly. This is generally not recommended, as this file can be overwritten by system updates. However, it can be useful if you need to make a quick change and don’t want to update GRUB.

Here’s how to do it:

  1. Open the terminal.
  2. Run the following command to open the grub.cfg file in the nano text editor:
sudo nano /boot/grub/grub.cfg
  1. Find the line that starts with linux. This line contains the command line options for the Linux kernel.
  2. Add fsck.mode=skip just before quiet splash on the linux line. The line should now look like this:
linux /boot/vmlinuz-5.4.0-26-generic root=UUID=xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx ro fsck.mode=skip quiet splash
  1. Save the file by pressing Ctrl + O, then exit nano by pressing Ctrl + X.

Conclusion

Skipping filesystem checks during the boot process can speed up boot times, but it’s generally not recommended unless you have a specific reason to do so. If you’re experiencing frequent filesystem repairs, it’s better to investigate and fix the underlying cause rather than bypassing the checks.

In later versions of Ubuntu, such as Ubuntu 22.04, the filesystem check runs in the background and does not slow down the boot process. If you’re using Ubuntu 20.04 and experiencing slow boot times due to filesystem checks, you might want to consider upgrading to a later version.

We hope this guide has been helpful. If you have any questions or run into any issues, don’t hesitate to ask for help in the comments.

Is it safe to skip filesystem checks during the boot process?

Skipping filesystem checks is generally not recommended unless you have a specific reason to do so. Regular filesystem checks help identify and fix filesystem errors, ensuring the integrity of your data.

What is the GRUB bootloader?

GRUB (Grand Unified Bootloader) is the default bootloader for Ubuntu and many other Linux distributions. It’s the software that loads the operating system into memory when your computer starts up.

Can I edit the GRUB configuration file directly?

Yes, you can edit the GRUB configuration file directly by modifying the /etc/default/grub file. However, it is generally recommended to edit this file instead of /boot/grub/grub.cfg as the latter can be overwritten by system updates.

How do I open the terminal in Ubuntu?

You can open the terminal in Ubuntu by pressing Ctrl + Alt + T on your keyboard. This keyboard shortcut will open a new terminal window.

How do I save and exit the nano text editor?

To save and exit the nano text editor, press Ctrl + O to save the file, then Ctrl + X to exit nano.

How do I update GRUB after modifying the configuration file?

To update GRUB after modifying the configuration file, run the command sudo update-grub in the terminal. This command generates a new grub.cfg file based on the settings in /etc/default/grub.

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