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What Does “System Information Disabled Due to Load Higher than 1.0” on Boot Mean?

Ubuntu 19

In this article, we will delve into the meaning of the message “System Information Disabled Due to Load Higher than 1.0” that you may encounter during system boot. This message can be a source of confusion, but once you understand the underlying mechanics, it becomes clear why it appears and how it impacts your system.

Quick Answer

When you see the message "System Information Disabled Due to Load Higher than 1.0" during system boot, it means that your CPU is handling more tasks than it can process simultaneously. This message is generated by a script called 50-landscape-sysinfo, which disables the display of system information to prevent further stress on the system. To permanently enable the system information display, you can modify the script, but be cautious as it may impact system performance.

Understanding System Load

Before we get into the specifics of the message, it’s crucial to understand what “system load” means. The system load average represents the average number of processes that are either in use by the CPU or waiting for CPU access, as well as processes waiting for I/O access.

In simple terms, it’s a measure of the workload your system’s processor is handling. When the system load is above 1.0, it means your CPU is handling more tasks than it can process simultaneously, which can slow down your system.

The Role of the 50-landscape-sysinfo Script

The message “System Information Disabled Due to Load Higher than 1.0” is generated by a script named 50-landscape-sysinfo. This script is responsible for displaying system information during the login process.

Here’s a simplified version of what the script does:

if [ "$(cat /proc/loadavg | cut -d ' ' -f1)" \< "1.00" ]; then
 /usr/bin/landscape-sysinfo
fi

In this script, /proc/loadavg is a file that contains the system’s load average. The cut -d ' ' -f1 command extracts the first field (the system load average) from this file. The script then compares this value to a threshold value (1.0 in this case). If the system load average is below this threshold, the script executes the landscape-sysinfo command, which displays the system information.

Why is System Information Disabled?

The purpose of disabling the system information display when the system load average is high is to prevent further stress on the system. Displaying system information requires additional CPU resources. If the system is already under heavy load, displaying this information could potentially worsen the situation and impact system performance.

How to Enable System Information Display

If you want to permanently display the system information during login, you can modify the 50-landscape-sysinfo script by removing the if statement that checks the load average. However, it is important to note that this may further stress the system, especially if the load average is consistently high.

Here’s how the modified script would look:

/usr/bin/landscape-sysinfo

This modification will cause the script to execute the landscape-sysinfo command regardless of the system load average.

Conclusion

In summary, the message “System Information Disabled Due to Load Higher than 1.0” indicates that the system load average is above a certain threshold, causing the system to disable the display of system information during login. This is done to prevent additional stress on the system when the CPU is already under heavy load.

Understanding these aspects of your system can help you make informed decisions about how to manage your resources and maintain optimal performance. Always remember that any modifications to system scripts should be done with caution, as they can have a significant impact on system behavior and performance.

What does “system load” mean?

"System load" refers to the average number of processes that are either in use by the CPU or waiting for CPU access, as well as processes waiting for I/O access. It is a measure of the workload your system’s processor is handling.

Why does the system disable system information when the load is higher than 1.0?

When the system load is higher than 1.0, it means that the CPU is handling more tasks than it can process simultaneously. This can slow down the system. To prevent further stress on the system, the display of system information during login is disabled because it requires additional CPU resources.

Can I enable the display of system information even when the load is high?

Yes, you can modify the 50-landscape-sysinfo script by removing the if statement that checks the load average. However, it is important to note that this may further stress the system, especially if the load average is consistently high.

How do I modify the `50-landscape-sysinfo` script to enable system information display?

To enable system information display, you can modify the 50-landscape-sysinfo script by removing the if statement that checks the load average. The modified script would simply contain the command /usr/bin/landscape-sysinfo. However, be cautious as this modification may impact system performance if the load average is consistently high.

Why is it important to understand system load and its impact on system performance?

Understanding system load and its impact on system performance helps you make informed decisions about resource management. By monitoring the system load, you can identify when the CPU is under heavy load and take steps to optimize performance. It also helps in understanding the reasons behind system behavior and troubleshooting any performance issues.

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